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Typefaces (Fonts) for People with Reading Difficulties

This page has now been moved to typoface.blogspot.com.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Well that was pretty interesting thanks.

Anonymous said...

hi, in your opinion, what is the most readable font for dyslexics?

Haze Dweller said...

In my opinion, there is no such thing as a MOST readable font, for anyone dyslexic or not. To be searching for such a thing is to be barking up a fruitless tree.

John said...

I didn't notice any comment on clear type. I find when reading a great deal on the screen clear type lessens the fatigue or want to continue reading volumes of information. Most of the time when I have much data to read on the computer screen I try to get it to my Kindle in 12 pt size by copy and past to Wordpad 5 x 7 Times Roman. Even if the major formatting is corrupted I can cruse the data and keep my interest. Plus the white paper contrast of the Kindle is anti fatigue.

Anonymous said...

Interesting article Dave. When I taught dyslexics I found that there were differences in on the type of font they preferred. The most popular were Comic Sans and Trebuchet. Font size (usually 14 or 16 for reading and word processing) and line spacing (1.5 or 2.0) were also important and helped readability. RL

ginger said...

I've been teaching for 28 years, and this is only the second time I've had a child who is truly dyslexic. Bright as can be, but struggles terribly with reading and writing. Thank you for telling me to stop barking up a fruitless tree, Haze Dweller. I spent a lot of time online the past 2 days, just searching for a magic bullet ( a font) that would 'cure' Caleb. I'd love it if anyone out there had a resource on helping dyslexic kids that they consider a 'bible' on the subject. I'll adjust, I'll rewrite, I'll do whatever. That kid needs to learn how to read successfully so he can feel better about himself. Thank you all.

Pixelscript said...

Hi, I've recently made a font called Gill Dyslexic which is designed for Dyslexics and has had a lot of good feedback. Your article was a very interesting read, thanks.

Anonymous said...

Fascinating! I am amused by the suggestion that sans serif type faces are more friendly as they are closer to handwriting when in fact many serifed fonts were based on the manuscript handwriting of the day! We are plagued at work with a lot of this accessibility pseudoscience. It has a lot to do with that people read less and less nowadays, and what they do read is more often on a screen than paper so of course they are more conversant with less formal fonts (and also atrocious grammar and spelling). I grew up to the age of 12 with minimal access to TV so books were all I had and I am convinced that this is a major factor in much so-called dyslexia. Lack of practise equals poor skills.

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